Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Johnny Depp . . . on music . . . and thanks a million

Not too long ago, I wrote an entry about Johnny Depp's musical roots prior to becoming an actor.

He actually went to Hollywood to be a rock star with no aspirations to be one of the greatest actors of our time.


Johnny Depp made Bill O'Reilly of the Fox Network's Pinhead or Patroit segment . . . of course as a patroit . . . here is an article on the reason why Bill deemed him worthy of "patriot status" . . .

January 26, 2008 . . . ACTOR Johnny Depp secretly visited London's Great Ormond St Hospital yesterday to donate a million pounds to thank staff for saving his daughter's life.

Depp arrived unexpectedly at the renowned children's hospital where eight-year-old Lily-Rose was treated last year when her kidneys failed.

Last week he invited five Great Ormond St doctors and nurses to the party for the London premiere of his film Sweeney Todd.

And unknown to the public, Depp spent four hours at the hospital telling bedtime stories to patients dressed as Captain Jack Sparrow from Pirates Of The Caribbean.

Last March, Lily-Rose spent nine days at Great Ormond St when E.coli poisoning led to the failure of her kidneys.


*********************


Rolling Stone recently did an interview with Johnny and hit on his love of music . . . here are some of the excerpts:



Was your family musical at all?


My mom and my dad weren't particularly musical, no. But I did have an uncle who was a preacher, and he played hillbilly bluegrass guitar. So Sunday church services, it was like, "Hallelujah, brothers and sisters," and then he would start picking "Stepping on the Clouds." That was where I got the bug: watching my uncle play the guitar with his little gospel group, right in front of me.


What was the first record you bought?


I don't know if I bought it, but the first record I remember listening to nonstop, oddly, was Dean Martin, Everybody Loves Somebody. And then Boots Randolph. And then the record album of Blackbeard's Ghost, with Peter Ustinov. I'd never seen the film — I didn't see it until I was in my late thirties. But I knew it verbatim. Slightly ironic. And then I turned that corner into preteen and I remember listening to Frampton Comes Alive! too much. My brother's ten years older than me. He grabbed the needle off the album and there was this horrific noise — wrrrraarrrar. He said, "Listen, man, you're killing me. Try this." And he put on Van Morrison's Astral Weeks. And it stirred me. I'd never heard anything like it. I said, "OK, maybe Frampton Comes Alive! is a little tired." Then my brother, very pleased with himself, started turning me on to other things, like the soundtrack to Last Tango in Paris.


How did listening to music become making music?


When I was twelve, I talked my mom into picking up a Decca electric guitar for me for twenty-five dollars. It had a little blue plush amp. And then, this is horrible, the first thing I did was steal a Mel Bay chord book. I went to this store, stuffed it down my pants and walked out. It had pictures — that's why I needed it so badly, because it was immediate gratification. If I could match those photographs, then I was golden. I conquered it in days. I locked the bedroom door, didn't leave, and taught myself how to play chords. I started learning songs by ear.


What was the first song you could play through?


Every kid with a guitar at that time, the first things that came up were almost always "Smoke on the Water," obviously, and "25 or 6 to 4," by Chicago. But the first song I played all the way through must have been "Stairway to Heaven." I remember getting through the fingerpicking and just cursing Jimmy Page.


What was your first band?


When I was about thirteen, I got together with some other kids in the neighborhood. This one guy had a bass, we knew a guy who had a PA system, we made our own lights. It was really ramshackle and great. We'd play at people's backyard parties. Everything from the Beatles to Led Zeppelin to Cheap Trick to Devo — and "Johnny B. Goode" was the closer.


Click here to read more excerpts from the article. While you are there, check out the gallery of Johnny Depp on the cover of the Rolling Stone.



Saturday, January 5, 2008

Somewhere in Time







Beyond Fantasy

Beyond Obsession

Beyond time itself,

He will find her



A beautifully haunting time travel story

about a love so strong, it can

overcome the obstacle of time itself



The film begins in May 1972, when playwright Richard Collier meets an old woman who gives him a pocket watch asking him to come back to her. Eight years later, Richard stays at the Grand Hotel and falls in love with a photograph of a beautiful woman. Richard asks Arthur Biehl, an old man who's been at the hotel since 1910, who the woman is and learns that she is Elise McKenna, a famous stage actress. Richard then researches who Elise is and learns that she was the old woman who gave him the pocket watch eight years ago.

Richard learns about time travel from an old college professor of his and that it can be achieved if one can go under hypnosis. However, to achieve this state of hypnosis, one must remove all things from sight that are related to the current time. He is also warned that such a process would leave one very weak, perhaps dangerously so. Richard heads back to his hotel room and then tries to travel back in time to the year 1912 under hypnosis with a tape recorder only to fail under stress. After a trip to the hotel's attic, Richard finds an old guest book from 1912 with his signature in it only to learn that he was there.

Richard again goes under hypnosis (this time without the tape recorder, since it was not around in 1912) and succeeds. Upon arriving in 1912, Richard looks all over the hotel for Elise, even meeting Arthur as a little boy, and has no luck finding her. Finally, Richard meets Elise standing by a tree by the lake and she asks him if he's the one. Before he can ask why, Elise's manager, William Fawcett Robinson, tells Richard to leave Ms. McKenna alone. Richard continues to seek Elise out again until finally she agrees to walk with him. Richard finally asks why Elise asked if he was the one and she replies that Robinson knows that she will meet a man that will change her life. Richard also shows Elise the same pocket watch in which she will give him 60 years later.

Upon returning to the hotel, Elise invites Richard to her play. Richard attends the play and upon visiting Elise during intermission finds her getting her picture taken. Upon spotting Richard, Elise smiles and the picture is then taken. This picture is the same one in which Richard will see 68 years later at the Grand Hotel. Later, Richard receives a letter from Robinson asking to meet him immediately, that it is a matter of life and death. Robinson tricks Richard and has him tied up and thrown into the stables. Later, Robinson tells Elise that Richard has left her and isn't the one, but she replies that she doesn't believe him and he's wrong. Elise admits to Robinson that she loves Richard and that he will make her very happy. Dispirited, Robinson leaves her dressing room and reminds her that they leave within the hour.

Richard wakes up the next morning and escapes the stables. He runs to Elise's room only to discover that her party has left. Richard then goes out to the hotel's deck to find Elise running towards him. They return to his room together and make love. Later that evening, Elise asks Richard if he's going to marry her in which he responds yes. She then tells him that the first thing she will do for him is buy him a new suit (the suit Richard has been wearing the entire time in 1912 is about ten to fifteen years out of style). Richard begins to show Elise what a wonderful suit it is because of its many pockets. He is alarmed when he reaches into one and finds a penny that has the date of 1979 on it. Snapping him out of his hypnotic-induced time travel, Richard fades from 1912 with Elise screaming his name in horror as he drifts back to 1980.

Richard wakes up in the hotel having returned back to his own time. He is very weak, physically and emotionally exhausted from his trip through time. He tries to hypnotise himself again without success. After wandering around the hotel and staring for hours at Elise's picture, Richard returns to his room where he sits in a daze for days without eating. Arthur checks on Richard in his room and finds him very sick and calls for a doctor. Richard then sees himself drifting above his body and is drawn to a light in a window. In the light is Elise, waiting for him just as he remembered her where they will remain together for all time.

Source: Wikipedia






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